Careers advice for GCSE students getting their results

On Thursday 25th August, thousands of students will get their GCSE results. These results will affect their decisions on what to do next and it is important for them to consider their options carefully and seek careers advice where appropriate.

Students will consider whether to leave school, stay on in a sixth form, go to college or enter into work-based learning, such as Apprenticeships. There are many education and training options available to 16-19 year olds and it’s important to make the right decisions.

GCSE results and careers advice

Students receiving their GCSE results need to consider their future options and this is where careers advice and guidance can support their decision-making process.

Not everyone will automatically want to go on to do A-levels and, depending on a young person’s interests and skills, they should pursue a career route that suites them.

For the majority of students in the UK, they will have been supported by CASCAID’s careers guidance solution, Kudos. This helps them to identify their interests and skills and the careers that may suit them. For students with home access to Kudos, this a good time to consult their ‘Action Plan’ report and input their GCSE results. The ‘Action Plan’ report provides a good basis for making decisions on the next step of their career journey.

Useful careers features

To help students after their GCSE results, there are a number of features and articles in Kudos that will be useful for them. We have outlined some of those that may be of interest:

• Explore careers related to your qualification/ s and future educational level/ s.

• Update your ‘My Action Plan’ report with your GCSE results. Set goals to help you explore and put a plan into action to help you achieve your learning and career objectives.

• Start to build or update your CV using the structured CV builder.

• Read the articles within the ‘General Information’ section. You might find the following useful:

Education:

GCSEs and How You Can Use Them
Options at 16
Further Education Options
Apprenticeships
Finance for Study for Young People

Employment:

Planning for Your Future
Prince’s Trust
Work Experience

Founded in 1969 and owned by the world-renowned Loughborough University, CASCAID are committed to creating innovative resources which help young people and adults make the best possible decisions about their future career, learning and training options.

‘We don’t have a dedicated Careers Adviser and I find that CASCAID products really help us to ensure that we have a systematic approach to integrating careers into the curriculum.’
– Teacher, Secondary school

For schools and colleges that would like to find out more about Kudos and our range of careers information and guidance solutions, register here for a demonstration webinar or request a free two-week trial.

Alternatively, call the team on 01509 226868 or email enquiry@cascaid.co.uk.

17 top tips to help maximise your Kudos subscription

Easy to navigate and intuitive to use, Kudos, the UK’s most popular, impartial careers guidance program, is designed to seamlessly embed itself within your career guidance activity. This is great news for teachers and careers advisers who can rely on the breadth of up-to-date information Kudos offers as well as the wide range of free classroom resources.

With a new version of Kudos recently launched that has been developed with input from young people, teachers and advisers, we thought it would be a great time to put together our top tips for making the most of your Kudos subscription…

  1. Register for a free demonstration webinar with one of our program specialists and explore Kudos in further detail from the comfort of your own office!
  2. Get insight into the progress your students are making with their career journey via CASCAID Manager. Free to access, this student tracking suite now shows you the impact Kudos is having on each cohorts’ progress as well as ‘distance travelled’.
  3. Help students decide which KS4 and KS5 subjects will help them in their career plans with the new ‘What subjects should I study?’ section.
  4. Encourage students to explore the career opportunities that they could progress to in different industry sectors with the improved ‘Work Areas’ section, accessed through the tool bar.
  5. Inspire students to get engaged in experiences that will help them stand out in the future, with the head start action plan ideas within ‘My Profile’.
  6. Develop students’ self-awareness by encouraging them to explore the redesigned ‘Is this for me?’ section where they can discover how well suited each career is to them.
  7. Remember, information entered into the previous version of Kudos will not be accessible in the new version.
  8. Make use of the wide range of updated support materials including lesson plans, guides and ‘How to…’ short films.
  9. Encourage students/clients to access Kudos from home; helping to involve parents in the careers guidance process.
  10. Maximise class time by using CASCAID Manager to create up to 200 users at a time.
  11. Monitor student/client activity with CASCAID Manager, including whether they have completed the likes & dislikes section, chosen any potential careers and when they last logged in.
  12. Use the new at-a-glance dashboard also within CASCAID Manager to organise by group/cohort and filter by activity; making it easy to identify individuals or groups of students/clients that need intervention and extra support.
  13. With information gathered from CASCAID Manager you can plan targeted careers activity, including work experience.
  14. Download a copy of the ‘Framework for careers, employability and enterprise education’ and discover how CASCAID products can help support each of the learning outcomes.
  15. Link Kudos to your VLE/ Moodle to encourage student use and reassure parents it is a trusted source.
  16. Maximise your budget by subscribing to the complete Kudos package, offering complete careers guidance for as little as 60p* per student.
  17. Use the ‘recording of achievements’ feature within Kudos HE from Year 10 onwards to get students ready for UCAS/ course applications

Subscribers to Kudos have been automatically updated to the new version, if you are yet to explore it, what are you waiting for! Packed with new features as well as an engaging new design, feedback shows that this enhanced version is set to be as popular as ever…

“As a school we were looking for a careers tool that would provide reliable data, engage all stakeholders, be value for money and ultimately be a key driver in raising the aspirations in our community. We wanted to make an evidence based decision on the product and it was important for us that we had the capacity to measure the impact it would have. The new version of Kudos offers everything we were looking for and more.”

Tom, Senior Teacher, Thomas Adams School

“The new version is really flexible to use. I’m finding it really useful in subject lessons as well as in careers work.”

Catherine, Careers Adviser, Future Focus

“Kudos is the main resource that I use to provide my students with support and guidance. I like the ‘distance travelled’ function in the new version which gives me some good intelligence on how students are progressing.”

Kathryn, John Willmott School

“There are some very good new features in the update. The tracking features in the Manager as well as the links to courses and Apprenticeships are really useful. Kudos helps me to deliver impartial careers support and this version will allow students to take real ownership and see the links between their interests, subjects and careers.”

Judith, secondary school, West Midlands

“The new version is visually pleasing and very clear. I really like the links to LMI and the choice of starting points for students. It feels like a holistic tool for impartial guidance.”

Rhonda, Rushcliffe School

So, what’s new?

This new version includes all of the great support, including reliable, impartial careers information that young people need to make those critical life choices. From subject choice at Key Stage 4 to post-16 options such as A-levels, college courses, apprenticeships or the world of work, Kudos can help inform and support. What’s more, with the personalised experience based on their likes and dislikes they receive personalised career ideas that help to develop their self-awareness.

Along with a new look, Kudos is packed with new content that has been designed to offer even greater support to young people, teachers and advisers and includes:

  • Recommended subjects for each career
  • Head start action planning designed to help students stand out from the competition
  • Improved LMI and career information
  • Enhanced progression support
  • The ability to explore career families; opening up even more career avenues
  • The option to easily relate careers to salary and qualifications

Following feedback from users, we have also added a new ‘Finish Later’ option, which allows users to save their progress so far and continue at another time; great for when careers guidance is fitted in around other activities and time is limited.

We understand that young people often struggle to relate subjects to careers, with the new ‘What should I study?’ option, they can find out which subjects are required for the careers they are interested in  – perfect for those considering GCSE or A-level choices

Want to find out more?

 Register here for a free demonstration webinar and explore all that Kudos has to offer, alternatively, email enquiry@cascaid.co.uk or call the team on 01509 22 68 68 to discuss your requirements.

 

National Careers Week – My first job

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National Careers Week has put the CASCAID team in a reflective mood; thinking back over those early work experiences and the skills learnt.

Our Marketing Copywriter, Kellie Tillyer, reflects on her first job:

“I started work at a young age; just 14, working Saturday and Sunday in a factory shop in the basement of a working cotton mill!

Being from Oldham, a major player in cotton spinning, in many ways it was hard to avoid, in some capacity, working in a mill – there were simply so many of them.

The shop I worked in was large, selling everything from toys to clothes, food to homewares. I worked there for many years, even going back and working over my university holidays.

As a retail assistant my duties were wide and varied, there were those I enjoyed; putting out stock and those I loathed; vacuuming the shop floor!

Beyond the practical skills of the workplace, my early work experience taught me how to work with people of different ages and backgrounds, how to manage my time effectively and it created in me a sense of independence that is very much at my core.

However, I also look back on my early working life with a twinge of sadness, I really enjoyed creating product displays and presenting merchandise – and I was good at it too. As an adult I now realise I would have loved a career in visual merchandising but through the limited careers guidance I was given, my skills and experiences were never explored beyond the academic. At that young age I didn’t understand a ‘career’ in retail was a possibility; careers were things such as doctor, nurse, police officer etc.

Of course, the career path I have ultimately followed, within marketing communications, has been fulfilling and I have had many great work experiences. I can’t help but wonder though, if the careers guidance I received had spent more time understanding my likes and dislikes, skills and experiences, rather than focusing on predicted grades, would I have followed a different career path?”

National Careers Week – My first job

future

Experiences gained early in a young person’s exposure to work are incredibly important in shaping their future skills.

Today we continue our series of posts, looking at the early careers of the CASCAID team, with an article from Jagdip Singh, one of our Software Developers.

“From a young age I’ve been presented with opportunities to work in various different roles ranging from family related businesses to office work at factories.

One of my first jobs was at a local dairy product supplier. My role was as the receptionist with the main task of being someone who spoke to customers over the telephone. The customers were local shop owners who would call you and place an order or complain because something had gone wrong in the logistics of the dairy and that they hadn’t received their order on time, usually in the earlier hours of the morning. My shift started at 8 am; however the nature of the business meant that the logistics (delivery of orders) and customer rage, disappointment and frustration had begun at 3 am. The first part of my role meant going through a list of voicemails from these customers. It was almost as if the management at the dairy were passing blame to the customers and vice versa with me being caught in the crossfire of communication as the first point of contact. I then had to call various businesses to remind them of overdue payments causing much frustration for the customer. Customers complaining about the dairy products such as the milk containing mixed water or that the date labels had been forged was the norm. Needless to say, this was an example of a bad work experience but something that taught me patience with dealing with people over the phone, people that were not particularly happy.

If there was something positive that I could take from this job it was that I wanted more. I felt a sense of pride that, rather than watching the same TV and playing video games throughout the summer, I was out there doing a full-time job making money. So this trend continued over to other holiday periods and gave me the desire to be working and doing more rewarding things during unoccupied time.

During my time at University I took up a part time shift at an off-license that I shared with my older sibling. This was an active customer facing role between 8 am and 11 pm. The biggest benefit of this work place was that I was able to talk with people from different cultures, backgrounds and age groups that I would otherwise would never have been given the opportunity to do. I learnt that the time of the day meant a lot about how a person would be, for example the elderly folk in the morning who were very open, would tell stories about themselves were very different to the people who had come back from a tiring shift at work who had closed themselves up and would not talk. I remember scenarios where children would turn up to buy sweets but be short of 5p and not able to buy the sweet they wanted and I would give in to my internal guilt and let them just take it.

I learnt a lot about people in general and myself during these roles before becoming what I am now, and most, if not all, of my experiences have given me a fair understanding of what a good and bad work experience is, motivating me to study harder so that I have a wider selection of options to be able to choose from something which I believe is very important in the career development of any young person who wants to be successful.”

 

National Careers Week – My first job

NewspaperTo celebrate National Careers Week, we’ve asked members of the CASCAID team about their early experiences of work and how those experiences have influenced their careers.

Yesterday, our Interim Chief Executive, Annette Wade, recalled some of her earlier work roles and how the skills she developed then have been used virtually every day throughout her career. And yes, we’re still waiting for her to perform her S Club 7 dance.

Today, we hear from Gaye Rowlson, our Marketing & Communications Co-ordinator. Continue reading “National Careers Week – My first job”

National Careers Week – My first job

Employers and industry bodies regularly highlight the importance of work readiness in young people and the fact that they find young recruits lacking in experience and awareness of workplace skills.

But with the reduction in the number of young people engaging in work experience and/or having a “Saturday job” it is hardly surprising as they are not getting the opportunity to engage in a work environment early on.

Experiences gained early in a young person’s exposure to work are incredibly important in shaping their future skills. To celebrate National Careers Week, we’ve asked members of the CASCAID team about their early experiences of work and how those experiences have influenced their careers. Continue reading “National Careers Week – My first job”