The Impact of FE Learning

A report from the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills,“The Impact of FE Learning”, has found that undertaking further education has had many career, financial, personal and social benefits for the learners and wider community.

The report has found that a third of men and nearly a third of women who participated in further education got a better job as a result.

“This report is strong evidence that at all ages learning isn’t just a nice-to-have: it’s important for both personal and professional development.” Matthew Hancock MP, Skills Minister.

The report found that most people’s reason for undertaking the additional learning was job-related (40% of learners). Of the people who gave this as their reason, 75% wanted to improve their job prospects or enter a new career and 15% wanted to improve their ability in their current job.

The role of Information, Advice and Guidance was also discussed in the report, with 56% of learners indicating that they have received some form of IAG. The main source of this IAG was from the FE college itself.

Regarding the type of information they had been given, 81% of men and 72% of women considered themselves well informed in relation to the content of the course and the subject they would be covering. Half believed they had been relatively well informed in relation to the labour market potential associated with the training. In addition, two thirds indicated that they received useful advice in relation to how skills gained through training might be useful in a job.

Other findings from the report include:

  • Increased pay- on average, earnings increased by 2.75%.
  • Job promotions- 18% of men and 12% of women got promoted after taking additional training.
  • Increased job satisfaction- 58% of respondents who completed their course or training reported this.
  • Self-confidence/self-esteem increases- 80% of respondents have experienced this.

The report surveyed 4,000 learners who had completed their course in 2010/2011.

FE colleges support a wide range of learners with their education needs to help them with the next step to higher-level education or sustainable employment.

The impact from education coupled with quality and effective careers guidance can provide FE learners with the guidance and information they need for a successful transition from education to employment.

At CASCAiD, we have a range of programs to inspire a variety of students to plan their future.

Kudos Inspire supports the extension of the statutory duty, which now requires the provision of impartial careers guidance to students aged 16-18 from September 2013. Students who are considering moving on to higher education can explore HE options and create a unique UCAS application within Kudos Inspire, as well as creating an up-to-date and informative CV to help them with their next steps to finding sustainable employment.

Adult Directions, perfect for adult learners, will generate career ideas and highlight the qualification and entry routes needed for every career, so each user can be up to date with industry-verified information on over 1,900 career titles.

Careerscape, perfect for all students, is a library of education, employment and lifestyle information. Information is displayed through case studies, videos, photographs and detailed articles to help users gain real insight into different workplaces, work activities and education options.

For users wanting to continue education after school or for older users who want to return to learning to improve their career options or retrain in a different profession, Careerscape provides an excellent starting point to research their options.

To find out more about CASCAiD programs, please click here.

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